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A brief travel guide to the towns of the southern Costa Blanca, Spain.

Towns of southern Costa Blanca

Towns of southern Costa BlancaAlicanteUsually most people don't see Alicante other than from the window of the aircraft as they arrive at the international airport or from the window of their hire car, which they picked up from Alicante airport car hire terminal. However, spend a little more time and you will notice that Alicante has much more to offer than just a place of arrival and departure.The capital of the Costa Blanca, Alicante, can date its history back to the Romans and there is evidence of pre-historic history dating back to a settlement here even further. Initial impressions are poor as you make your way from the airport to the town, however once past the urban sprawl, you'll find a palm lined promenade along the front of the town by the harbour with its nightlife and associated restaurants and a tree lined shopping avenue. To the south of the town, the coastline stretches away for miles of golden sandy beach.TorreviejaTorrevieja is one of the most popular destinations on the southern "Costa Blanca" . Only 40 minutes drive from the airport of Alicante to the north, or 20 minutes from the smaller airport at Murcia, which is also served from the UK, Torrevieja is a bustling tourist community. There has been a settlement here for thousands of years, the reason becomes clear after a visit as Torrevieja is situated by 2 large saltwater lagoons where they still harvest the salt just as they have done for centuries. The lagoons are also the home to flamingos as well as many other types of birds.Torrevieja town is classically Spanish in design, with most inhabitants living in apartment blocks in ordered streets. A walk through the town highlights that it is a busy commercial centre servicing both the large number of tourists and the local Spanish and expat communities. The town, has a busy fishing port and marina and trips can be taken from here along the coast during the summer months.The main beach promenade was recently refurbished and provides a pleasant stroll, or the ideal place to sit and take in the views while sipping a coffee at one of the many beachfront cafes. Most days there is a small market selling souvenirs near to the beach and harbour and on Fridays each week, a large open air market selling all sorts of goods. The market can get very busy and parking near impossible, so an early start is the order of the day.There are many beaches to choose from, and a water park for the more adventurous.Golfers are probably best equipped along this stretch of coastline with lots to choose from, through the golf courses of Villamartin, Las Ramblas, Campoamor and Quesada which are the more well known. Torrevieja holiday accommodation is both plentiful and varied, from luxury villas on the golf courses or beachfront, to townhouses and apartments on urbanisations. There is something for every budget.VillamartinVillamartin is probably the best known golf course on the Costa Blanca. The resort has expanded and now includes the golf courses of Las Ramblas and Campoamor, so there is more than enough for the most avid golfer. A Villamartin golf holiday visitor, can divide their time between the golf course and the beach, of which there are many within a 5 minute drive and most are Blue Flag approved. A favourite has to be the beach at Cabo Roig overlooked by its watch tower, now a speciality fish restaurant.The resort comprises of a commercial centre with bars, restaurants, outdoor eating and a selection of shops. Around the centre there are plenty of Villamartin golf apartments, for rental from private owners. If your budget stretches a little more, there are many holiday urbanisations within a few minutes drive of the golf course, with either apartments or townhouses and most have communal pools and other facilities. Top of the range gives you luxury villas built overlooking the golf fairways, with their private pools and excellent location, these are the premier places to stay while you enjoy your vacation here.La MangaLa Manga del Mar Menor is a resort town near Murcia. The area has several golf courses and over 40km of beaches. The Mar Menor (Little Sea) is an enclosed salt water lake and the area is part of the Costa Calida. It is an ideal resort for water sports enthusiasts or for those wishing to learn because of the calm waters of the Mar Menor.There is a coastal strip of hotels and houses which runs along the side of the Mar Menor as well as many restaurants, bars and holiday apartments. Two nearby coastal towns are San Pedro del Pinatar and San Javier and Murcia and Cartagena are also worth including on your holiday itinerary as well as the old fishing village of Los Alcazares. The famous La Manga Club is also to be found close by and is well known for hosting many football clubs during the winter months.

Limon Costa Rica

Limon Costa Rica

The famous east coast of Costa Rica with places like Cauhita, Puerto Limon, Tortugeros and Barra del Colorado is a completely different thing then the west coast.You can fly here or take highway 32 from San Jos and enjoy the amazing scenery while driving. You can drive through Brauilo Carillo National Park and straight down to limn or go north and pass by the Volcano Barva, followed by Puerto Viejo and Sarapiqui.The temperature stays around high 20s all year but due to rain almost the whole year, the clouds will give some protection from the burning sun.. The best time on the year (to avoid rain) is in February to Mars, and August to October.Youll find restaurants scattered all along the road if you feel the urge for eating.Limn is also the place where almost all of Costa Ricas bananas are shipped when exported.Crime has been found somewhat higher then on the west coast so beware.The Beaches----------------Four kilometers north of puerto Limn are two small beaches. Playa Bonita with fine yellow sand, palm trees and some hotels. The water is not perfect for tourists though. Playa Portete has a dock where local fishermen land with their catches. Even further north is Mon where the government built a industrial harbor for freight ships back in the 1980s. Going south youll find the most visited place, the beach Cauhita. Cauhita is a quite large village with many thousands of inhabitants and is a hot target for backpacking tourists. It can be hard to find a rental in Cauhita. White san beaches fringed with coconut palms, a relaxing atmosphere and a calm Caribbean way of life attract a lot of tourists.There are also several smaller beaches close by Cauhita.Even further south Talamanca is the place to go. Close by are Playa Cocles, Playa Chiquita and Punta Uva.Sights of Limn------------------ Cahuita National Park. Over 1000 hectares of land with more then 14Km of beaches, all with nice mixes of coconut palm trees, mangrives and dense forrests,Snorkeling is offered all over the coast for those who would like to try it out. In the south the Gandoca-Manzanillo Game Preserve is of interest. You can visit punta mona (Monkey Point), said to have received its name from Columbus himself.Also plan a visit to Tortugeros and a trip on the canals. Youll most likely have to set aside 1-2 days for this trip as it is a long way to go. Make sure you bring clothes to change (after rain), insect repellant and clean drinking water and youll have a much nicer time! Not only will you find an extreme jungle here, you may also be lucky enough to encounter a sea turtle or two.Parque Vargas in Puerto Limn with its tall attractive palms and other tropical trees, flowers and animals close to the waterfront is a pleasant way of enjoying the beauty of the tropics.Eating -------- The food on the east coast is everything from local specialties, normal Costa Rican food, Caribbean food to French and Chinese. Be aware of the fact that not all food is compatible with all tourists!Bars & Nightclubs ----------------------- Night open bars and cantinas can always be found around the central parks in almost all Costa Rican towns. Puerto Limn is no exception. But many of these places in Limn should be avoided by tourists and single women should not be out after dark themselves without company.Limn with Cauhita is different from other beaches. The much greener water on the Caribbean side of Costa Rica makes a nice contrast to the bluish west coast water.Youll often find larger waves on the east coast as well.

The History Of Rancho Mirage California

The History Of Rancho Mirage California

Today, many of the communities in and around the Palm Springs area are hot tourist spots and boast of extreme wealth. Rancho Mirage, California is just one of the cities that have benefited by the worlds attraction to this beautiful desert area. Incorporated in 1973, Rancho Mirage is relatively young but has experienced tremendous growth over the past few decades. Rancho Mirage is situated in Riverside County and became the 16th city in that county. It may have seemed like the city was always destined for wealth and success. In fact, the first building permit issued by the city was for the Sunrise Country Club Development. And it didnt take very long for Rancho Mirage to start attracting attention. In 1974, President Nixon wrote his State of the Union Address while golfing at Rancho Mirages Annenberg Estate. Prince Charles also visited the estate in this year, and likely noticed a great deal of development because more than 5,000 dwellings were under construction. The activity was so great that Rancho Mirage experienced an $11 million growth in valuation ranking it as the fifth wealthiest city in Riverside County. Throughout the years, notables and dignitaries continued to flock to Rancho Mirage. It was here in 1976 that Frank Sinatra married Barbara Marx. Even President Ford loved the area so much that he purchased a home in the Thunderbird Country Club. Maybe he was in love with the area or maybe he wanted to be closer to his favorite golf courses. In any event, the closeness to golf greatness did not improve his game. In 1977, President Ford hit two people with a golf ball during the same month.Despite several floods that did considerable damage to the area, Rancho Mirage continued growing in population, size and grandeur. Malls were added as were numerous country clubs, resorts and luxury establishments. And in 1985, a huge flood control project was started to eliminate the threat of high waters. Today, presidents and dignitaries still visit the area, and Rancho Mirage has grown to be a cultural hub. In addition to luxury resorts and golf, a visitor to Rancho Mirage can now benefit from fine art centers, wildlife and ecology education, and elegant music halls.

Holidaying in Leicester

Holidaying in Leicester

Perched on the banks of the River Soar and edging the English National Forest, Leicester is a thriving, progressive city with a vibrant immigrant population.Now the largest city in the East Midlands, Leicester is one of the oldest cities in England with a history going back to pre-Roman times. Once inhabited by Celtic tribes, Leicester became a settlement on the Roman road and the remains of Roman baths can be seen today. The city was later a major centre during the industrial revolution and was linked by the Grand Union Canal to London and Birmingham. Modern Leicester is a very livable city graced with with Victorian architecture. Many of the inner city streets are pedestrianised and the area is well-served with shopping outlets including Leicester Market, Europe's largest covered market. The city's historic quarter lies to the west and is marked by the castle, cathedral and a bevy of medieval churches.Leicester's rich cosmopolitan mix results in a wide range of ethnic foods and cultural events. Leicester is home to many fine Indian restaurants and the city resounds to festivals such as Diwali.Transport: getting there and getting aroundLeicester is conveniently located on the UK's main transport arteries. The city is close to the M1 motorway and lies on the Midland Main Line from London to Sheffield, Nottingham and Leeds. High-speed trains can reach London in just over an hour. Trains from Leicester arrive at London St Pancras from where Eurostar international services depart for Europe.Leicester is convenient for East Midlands Airport which is served by low cost carriers with international flights to Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin and Frankfurt and domestic flights to Edinburgh and Belfast. Limited services connect with Barbados, Mexico and Florida.An extensive bus network operates in and around Leicester.Climate:Mild and wet best describes the English weather and the further north you go, the colder it gets. However, inland temperatures don't get much below freezing in the winter months of December to February, or much above 30C in summer.However, the East Midlands tends to have higher rainfall in the summer and less sunshine in winter. Accommodation:from cheap stays to luxury resortsCheck on the internet for the range, location and cost of hotels in LeicesterCheck on the internet for the range, location and cost of Leicester hotelsCheck on the internet for the range, location and cost of Leicester Events:what's on and what's hot*The Comedy Festival in February is a ten-day laugh fest. It's the UK's longest running comedy festival.*The Leicester Early Music Festival is in May. As well as concerts, it features workshops, exhibitions, dance day, family day and wine and whisky tasting.*The Caribbean Carnival in August is the most colourful festival in the city.*The Riverside Festival is held on the first Saturday of every June.*Theis Leicester International Music Festival held in September brings the best of classical, jazz and world music to the Midlands.

Portal Airdrie

Airdrie is a city located in Alberta, Canada. It is just north of Calgary inside of the Calgary-Edmonton Corridor. As part of Calgary's Census Metropolitan Area It adds to area's estimated (1,037,100 in 2004). Because Airdrie is a member community of the Calgary Regional Partnership, It also adds to that regions population of about 1.1 million. Due to Airdrie's close proximity to Calgary, their has been an explode in population over the past few years. Airdrie's population was 27,069 In 2005, making it Calgary's largest politically distinct suburb.Airdrie started as a railway village in 1889 during the construction of the Calgary and Edmonton Railway. Again because of it's close proximity to Calgary, today Airdrie is a gorgeous bedroom community and living industrial centre. Nose creek is its primary body of water, which is also the focal point of a number of green spaces and city parks in the city. One of the more popular of these parks is Nose Creek Park. Nose Creek Park hosts the annual Airdrie Festival of Lights every Christmas season. Other annual festivals celebrated include the Airdrie Pro Rodeo and the Canada Day Parade. Transportaion in Airdrie is a breeze because it is situated on the Queen Elizabeth II Highway, the biggest highway in Alberta. This highwayh connects Calgary and Edmonton, thus making Airdrie a small and central transportation hub.Feel free to reprint this article as long as you keep the following caption and author biography in tact with all hyperlinks.

10 Must-dos When In Dublin

Few places around the world lend a friendlier hand than Dublin. The Emerald Isle offers wonderful hospitality, complemented by its warm and friendly hosts. A cosmopolitan city, Dublin is rightly proud of its rich heritage, but also presents a modern face in keeping with contemporary culture.1. Trinity CollegeHousing the Book of Kells, a near two century old manuscript written by monks, Trinity College is Dublins oldest university, built in 1592.2. Christ Church CathedralDublins oldest building dates back nearly one thousand years to 1038. It was built courtesy of the invading Vikings, a monument to serve a powerful army.3. Dublin CastleDating back to the Norman invasion, this wonderful example of medieval architecture captures the artistic influence of the time. Magnificent painted ceilings and crystal chandeliers portray the Ireland of one thousand years ago.4. National Gallery of IrelandMonet and Picasso are just two of the influential artists on display in the citys largest gallery. Some 2,500 paintings give a flavour of a historic past and present.5. Guinness StorehouseIrelands most famous export was once brewed in this famous old building. Since relocated, the Guinness Storehouse now delights in telling its visitors how one of the worlds favourite beverages came to be.6. Temple BarContrasting Dublins historic ancestry, Temple Bar brings the city right up to modern day with its cosmopolitan mix of bars, restaurants, shops and art galleries.7. Smithfield VillageMore eating, drinking and shopping can be found at Smithfield Village, a newly renovated development. A walk to the top of the Chimney presents magnificent, panoramic views of Dublin.8. Grafton StreetBig name department stores trade alongside local craft shops in the busiest shopping area of Dublin. Traditional Irish gifts and souvenirs can be found more easily in the adjacent Nassau Street.9. Pint of GuinnessNo visit to Ireland would be complete without a tipple of the world famous Irish Guinness. Locals say it tastes better in its home city. Well, theres only one way to find out!10. Irish Grand NationalYou can smell the money amongst the punters present at one of the great sporting events of the calendar. Join the runners and riders during the month of April to witness the Irish Grand National.

Summary

A brief travel guide to the towns of the southern Costa Blanca, Spain.